Sedation

What Is Sedation Dentistry?

Occasionally a patient may become anxious and cannot relax during an office visit. As many as 30% of adults in America are afraid of needles. Sedation dentistry offers these dental patients a safe and effective alternative through sedation dentistry.

There are three forms of conscious sedation that allow a patient to relax and/or become sleepy. Forms of conscious sedation may involve nitrous oxide analgesia, taking an oral medication or receiving medication intravenously.

One of the benefits of sedation dentistry is that it eliminates movement during a periodontal or dental implant procedure. Sedation dentistry relaxes the patient and allows those who might avoid a dental visit a safe and anxiety-free alternative. If you are hesitant about scheduling your next visit, consider sedation dentistry. Ask us for more information, and we will be sure to put your mind at ease.

Oral Sedation

Patients who are more anxious may need an oral medication that is stronger than nitrous oxide. With oral sedation, the patient may be sleepy but can be aroused and will respond to simple commands. Minor side effects such as nausea or vomiting can occur with some medications. Before a visit in which a patient is to receive oral sedation, he/she will receive instructions about eating and drinking, what to expect and what to watch for after treatment. You will need assistance to get home after sedation.

Will you need to give my child a shot to do the dental work?

This is one of the most commonly asked questions that we get from our patient's parents. We try to minimize the discomfort of the injection by placing a gel that works as a local anesthetic to numb the tissue were the injection will be administered.

Profound local anesthesia is usually obtained five to ten minutes after the injection, depending on the area of the mouth where the anesthetic was placed. We always check to confirm that the area is numb before we begin to work. In cases of localized infection or trauma (like broken teeth), it is very difficult to obtain profound anesthesia. However, we do have other means of supplementing the anesthetic (like conjoined use of nitrous-oxide gas, medications, or conscious sedation).

Younger children, particularly pre-schoolers, may interpret the feeling of numbness as pain, and therefore cry. Please follow the post-operative instructions that we give you, in order to minimize complications such as lip biting.

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